Aussie Tees and Special Tennis Promotions Tennis Express Facebook Tennis Express Twitter Tennis Express You Tube New Tennis Express Blog

Racquet Specs

  • Head Size: 93 sq. in. MP
  • Length: 27 inches
  • Weight: Strung — 11.1 oz Unstrung — 10.6 oz
  • Tension: 48-57 Pounds
  • Balance: 5 Pts. Head Light
  • Beam Width: 20mm
  • Composition: Graphite/Graphene
  • Flex: 61
  • Grips Type: Hydrosorb Tour
  • Power Level: Low
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses
  • Shared Holes: None
  • Mains Skip:  8T, 8H
  • Swing Speed: Fast
  • Swing Weight: 329

HEAD Graphene Prestige Rev Pro Tennis Racquet Review


buy this racquet  demo this racquet

Head  YouTek Graphene Speed S Tennis Racquet

Groundstrokes
The Head Graphene Prestige Rev Pro manages to wrap the performance of a tweener in the package of a player’s frame. I really enjoyed how the 93 square inch head moved through my strokes, and I had a blast demoing the racquet. Typically, players’ sticks employ more mass to achieve power and plow through the ball very nicely. The Rev Pro, however, moves in the opposite direction, encouraging a faster, whippier stroke. As with the rest of the Graphene lineup, the distribution of mass has been shifted to the handle and top of the hoop. However, the difference between the areas with higher and lower concentrations of mass is not as extreme as some of the other Prestiges (including the MP and the S).The 16x19 string pattern provided the potential to either drive the ball flat or create dipping topspin. I was amazed by how easy it was to hit offensively penetrating shots as well as defensive blocks and slices. I didn’t feel quite as connected as I did with the Prestige S (which I believe is a result of the length and design of the frame’s throat), though I did feel like I had more leverage over the ball with the Rev Pro. I found the feel of contact to be comfortable (especially when hitting in the sweetspot), yet crisp, somewhere between the feel of the Prestige S and the MP.

Volleys
I was more than comfortable with the maneuverability of the Rev Pro at the net, thanks to the low static weight (for a player’s frame), small head, and thin beam. I never felt late to the ball, and it was easy to stay offensive, even against challenging opponents. The maneuverability, paired with the powerful response of the sweet spot, made it easy to put the ball away with little effort. Soft, short-angles and droppers were a lot of fun to hit, and had good action when hit with spin. The stability is not as solid as some heavier sticks (like the Prestige Pro and MP), however I found the string bed to be forgiving enough to help manage the twisting of the racquet in my hand on off-center hits.

Serves
The sound of the Rev Pro striking the ball on a big, flat serve is like a meteorite hitting the surface of the Earth. The ability to accelerate the head of the frame so effortlessly was a huge turn on, as it made blasting rockets a common occurrence. I felt more comfortable than usual when going for broke on second serves. Kickers and slices curved and bounced well as a result of the 16x19 pattern and head speed. I didn’t feel as precise as with the Prestige Pro, but who needs to be precise when you’re dropping bombs!

Overall
The Graphene Prestige Rev Pro is one of the most fun racquets I’ve played with in a long time. On paper, the specs don’t make a whole lot of sense: a 93 square inch head and a static weight around 11.2 ounces (about an ounce lighter than the old Prestige Mid). But, somehow, it works! The feel of the frame is a blend of the Prestige S and the Prestige MP. It is still fairly soft and comfortable (like the S, plus a little more crisp on off-center hits), but with a touch of “glassy” feeling feedback (like the MP). Accomplished players will enjoy the way the thin beam and compact head move through the air, while intermediate players with appreciate the access to easy power and spin potential (especially when paired with a shaped poly). But, fans of the older Head Mid frames should be well aware that the Rev Pro is a completely different animal from previous models.

About the Reviewer: Mitch Case is the Tennis Director at Woodridge Lake in Connecticut. He is also a PTR pro and a USRSA master technician.