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Dunlop Srixon Revo CX 2.0 Tour Racquet Review

Racquet Specs

  • Head Size: 95 sq. in. MP
  • Length: 27 inches
  • Weight: Strung — 11.6 oz Unstrung — 11.1oz
  • Tension: 45-60 Pounds
  • Balance: 12 Pts Head Light
  • Beam Width: 20/20/19mm
  • Composition: High-Elasticity Graphite
  • Flex: 60
  • Grip Type: Srixon Leather
  • Power Level: Low
  • String Pattern: 18 Mains / 20 Crosses 
  • Shared Holes: None
  • Main Skip: 8T, 10T, 8H, 10H
  • Swing Speed: Fast, Long Swing
  • Swing Weight: 314

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Fans of the classic, player oriented Dunlop frames of old started rejoicing as soon as Dunlop officially joined forces with international racquet maker Srixon. With Kevin Anderson endorsing it, the new Dunlop Srixon Revo CX 2.0 Tour was a return to form for the long time brand. This compact player frame sported some new tech to go along with its classic attributes. A special graphite construction called Syncro Charge improved feel and aided in stability off center. The hoop of the frame also took advantage of Sonic Core Technology, a blend of urethane and silicone for better dwell time and energy return. All of this came in a 95 inch head size with a control minded 18x20 string pattern. Having been a fan of classic Dunlops like the HotMelt and Muscle Weave lines, I was eager to try this latest offering from Dunlop.

 

Groundstrokes
Having tested many Dunlops in recent years that were very power oriented, I was happy to see the Revo CX 2.0 Tour put the emphasis back on control. The compact head and thin 20/20/19mm beam provided outstanding control and accuracy from both wings off the ground. I was consistently able to hit aggressive targets and felt I could move the ball around the court at will. With a 60RA flex to go along with the thin beam, this frame didn’t blow anyone off the court with raw power. The 11.6oz strung weight provided decent punching power and it was headlight enough for me to add plenty of racquet head speed. Having a bit more mass in the head might have given it more punch but it seemed to also have room for customization that could boost the power level. The 18x20 pattern was outstanding at controlling the ball and I enjoyed how easy it was to flatten out balls that were left short in the court. Spin production wasn’t as pronounced as it was on more modern frames, but I was able to whip the racquet through the strike zone and generate enough spin to play with extra margin when I needed to. Stability was solid for a mid 11oz frame but I found myself wishing it had a bit more mass in the hoop as I noticed a bit of twisting when trying to re-direct high levels of pace. The frame was incredibly precise off the ground and most of its limitations could be addressed through customization.

 

Volleys & Serves
When it comes to modern racquets, the Revo CX 2.0 Tour was pretty close to volley Nirvana. Its blend of classic player frame attributes left me wanting to come to net as quickly as possible. The nimble head size and super headlight balance made it a breeze to snap the frame into position for reflex volleys and quick exchanges. I enjoyed the low power level as it let me attack volleys without fear of driving them long. I found enough mass to make quick work of balls that were left up and the excellent control let me direct volleys to any area of the court I wanted to. A bit more mass would have been welcome for fighting off body shots and hard hit balls, but the ability to play aggressively with this racquet minimized how noticeable any issues were. The flexible nature of the racquet also made it easy to execute a wide variety of touch and drop volleys. The outstanding ball pocketing allowed me to bleed pace off my shots and drop them down right in front of the net.

 

Serving with the Revo CX 2.0 Tour required a more cerebral approach. The frame’s inherent lack of power was most noticeable for me on the serve. While I had no trouble accelerating through contact, my serve just lacked the heavy feel that accompanied more powerful racquets. My kick serve also was a little more limited as I found it challenging to get enough spin to really jump the ball off the court. My slice serve was the most effective, as the string bed gripped the ball well and sent it low and wide when I served from the ad side. The racquet’s outstanding control and accuracy also came into play on my serve. I was able to pick really aggressive serve locations and use location variety to keep returners from teeing off on my serves.

 

Feel/Comfort
Anybody longing for the flexible, smooth feel of older player frames would be right at home with the Revo CX 2.0 Tour. It played with a smooth, dampened feel across the string bed. The low flex rating produced a welcome amount of ball pocketing and I enjoyed being able to really feel the ball on the string bed. The usage of Sonic Core (silicone & urethane) did an excellent job of absorbing vibration and providing a consistent response on every shot type. The soft, flexible construction and vibration absorbing materials provided outstanding comfort during my play test. The racquet was consistently pleasant no matter where I made contact. Players after the comfortable, buttery feel that many racquets today lack would be right at home with this model.

 

Overall
For many years, Dunlop was a global leader in producing high quality, player oriented frames. Their new partnership with Srixon seems to have renewed that commitment and the Revo CX 2.0 Tour shows they are off to a great start. The racquet offers an outstanding blend of feel and control. While it sacrifices some power off the baseline, it becomes an incredibly effective weapon at the net and can hit targets anywhere on the court. Advanced players who want to take big cuts at the ball, outsmart opponents and feel like they are on cloud 9 while doing it should enjoy taking the Dunlop Srixon Revo CX 2.0 Tour out for a hit.

 

About the Reviewer: Matt Locke currently serves as the Junior Programs & Development Coordinator for USTA-Idaho and is an active USTA League and Tournament player.

 


 

 

 


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